Bonus army
   In 1932, unemployed veterans of World War I organized a Bonus Expeditionary Force to march on Washington to petition for early payment of bonuses approved in 1924 and due to be paid in 1945. The Bonus Army of 15,000 to 20,000 men established a camp on the Anacostia Flats in Washington, D.C. A Bonus Bill was approved by the House of Representatives but rejected by the Senate in June 1932. Many of the marchers left the capital, and in July the administration of Herbert Hoover, fearing the possibility of violence, ordered the eviction of the remaining individuals. A military force, including tanks, led by General Douglas MacArthur, used teargas and bayonets to drive out the veterans and their families before setting fire to the camp. One veteran was shot dead by police during the confrontation. The images of the veterans fleeing in the face of troops with bayonets drawn and the burning camp against the backdrop of the Capitol buildings were widely shown on newsreels and in newspapers and contributed to the growing unpopularity of President Hoover.
   See also Bonus Act, 1936.

Historical Dictionary of the Roosevelt–Truman Era . . 2015.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bonus army — Campement de la Bonus Army en feu à Washington DC après l affrontement avec l armée (1932) La Bonus Army, aussi nommée Bonus March ou Bonus Expeditionary Force était un rassemblement d environ 20 000 vétérans américains de la Première Guerre …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Bonus Army — Infobox Military Conflict| conflict=Bonus Army Conflict caption=Shacks, put up by the Bonus Army on the Anacostia flats, Washington, DC, burning after the battle with the military, 1932. date=17 June 1932 place=Washington D.C., United States of… …   Wikipedia

  • Bonus Army — U.S. Hist. a group of 12,000 World War I veterans who massed in Washington, D.C., the summer of 1932 to induce Congress to appropriate moneys for the payment of bonus certificates granted in 1924. * * * World War I veterans who gathered in… …   Universalium

  • Bonus Army — 38°52′0.3″N 76°59′53″O / 38.86675, 76.99806 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Bonus Army — U.S. Hist. a group of 12,000 World War I veterans who massed in Washington, D.C., the summer of 1932 to induce Congress to appropriate moneys for the payment of bonus certificates granted in 1924 …   Useful english dictionary

  • bonus — 1773, Stock Exchange Latin [Weekley], from L. bonus good (adj.); see BENE (Cf. bene ). The correct noun form would be bonum. In U.S. history the bonus army was tens of thousands of World War I veterans and followers who marched on Washington, D.C …   Etymology dictionary

  • Bonus Bill — Two major bills of the United States Congress have been called the Bonus Bill. The first, in 1817, proposed spending proceeds from the Second Bank of the United States on an east west road. Later, this term was applied to welfare bills for World… …   Wikipedia

  • Bonus — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Sur les autres projets Wikimedia : « Bonus », sur le Wiktionnaire (dictionnaire universel) Le bonus (du latin bonus, « bon »,… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • army — /ahr mee/, n., pl. armies. 1. the military forces of a nation, exclusive of the navy and in some countries the air force. 2. (in large military land forces) a unit consisting typically of two or more corps and a headquarters. 3. a large body of… …   Universalium

  • Bonus Act, 1936 —    Passed in January 1936 over President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s veto, the Bonus Act authorized the immediate payment of the bonus due to veterans of World War I. The payment had been due to be paid in 1945, but protests from veterans, such as… …   Historical Dictionary of the Roosevelt–Truman Era

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